Sunday, November 9, 2008

Article: Joe and the Mega Sized Smoothie - Language and Aspergers

I just want to draw your attention to a fascinating article on Psychology Today.

It's called

Joe and the Mega Sized Smoothie - Language and Aspergers

http://blogs.psychologytoday.com/blog/asperger039s-diary/200811/joe-and-the-mega-sized-smoothie-language-and-aspergers#new

The article provides a lot of insight into some differences between aspies and neurotypicals. Though the be fair, the aspie stuff was all "normal" to me. I actually found the neurotypical responses to be more fascinating and "different".

2 comments:

High Quality Mothering said...

My AS hubby gives most people the "benefit of the doubt", thinking they have "good" intentions...
except the ones in his family, especially the children. He accuses them of being manipulative a lot.

http://learningaspergian.blogspot.com

Paul Anderson said...

Reading the smoothie example, I have to say I too thought that neither was intentional and then wondered if I'd misunderstood the definition of intentional, or the basic question.

In that situation personally, I want the "largest" whatever it costs, and whatever happens to come with it. If I didn't have enough to cover the cost, I'm more than likely to either have nothing, or have something else rather than accept the smaller size.

I also found the NT's response to be puzzling and can't really understand their logic.

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As for the policeman story, as similar literal situation happened when I put a padlock key into a padlock which held an access door shut in work (a door which allowed customers access to the facilities) a few minutes before opening, and the key snapped in the padlock.

When questioned, did you break that key?", my answer was "no", but when asked, "who put the key in there?", my answer was "me, but I didn't break it" (the key melted and twisted off when it turned).

I felt that being asked if I broke the key, implied that there was deliberate will on my part of which there wasn't. I also failed to see why anyone else hadn't picked up on the important question: who locked the padlock in the first place, as it was never ever locked, the ring part of the padlock was just hooked on to the door and frame to keep the door closed, but not locked for ease of staff going to and fro

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And thirdly, I'm pretty specific when ordering food, and in that situation I would have stated everything *that I wanted* except for the things I dont require on my mexican burriot, and only been specific about what I don't want if asked by the server. I can't rely on people when it comes to food.