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Book: The Perfect Gift for a Man (Released Today!)


Ok, I'll admit up front that this post is a shameless plug but it's for a good cause.


The Book
Long-time readers of this blog may recall that recently, a group of Australian bloggers, myself included, participated in a "man-week" exercise designed to heighten awareness and acceptability of emotions in men.

The man-week initiative resulted in a book containing 30 stories by Australian men, myself included. Some of the material was on various blogs during man-week and some is new.

You can visit the web site for the book at;

The book is available for purchase as softcover or ebook and all proceeds from the book are going to the Inspire Foundation in an effort to reduce the suicide rates among men.

Men and Emotions
Men in our society, and particularly men in Australia are often raised to be the "rock of the family" and our emotions are supressed at an early age.

I can remember being quite young and having been hurt quite badly...

my father was working on his boat trailer lights and asked me to hold some wires for him - they were the wrong wires and I got scorch marks on my hand.

...My father's initial reaction was to tell me that "boys don't cry - only sissies and girls cry".

It's not his fault, that's how he was raised - and it was how I was raised. It's my hope that I can avoid perpetuating the myth of the unemotional male in our family. I'm encouraging my children to love, to laugh, to play and to cry.


Aspie Men and Emotions
The emotional problems that men face are compounded by aspergers diagnosis. Not a day goes by when I don't read some article online which suggests that aspies are "unemotional". In truth, aspies are a turmoil of emotions and the fact that they lack the expression to get these out only adds to the stress. Add this to a society where male emotions are actively discouraged and it's little wonder the suicide rate is so high.


A Personal Note
As I write this, my thoughts can't help but turn once again to fellow aspie blogger, Zach Lassiter, who right now is in a very dark place, and has been for several weeks. His web site and twitter still contain what were intended to be his final posts and other than knowing that he was hospitalised, I've no idea of his current status.

Zach, my hopes and prayers are with you.

Comments

A Lurking Aspie said…
A Personal Note
As I write this, my thoughts can't help but turn once again to fellow aspie blogger, Zach Lassiter, who right now is in a very dark place, and has been for several weeks. His web site and twitter still contain what were intended to be his final posts and other than knowing that he was hospitalised, I've no idea of his current status.


Your link points to thezach.net, but have you checked out aspieweb.net? His latest post there, made yesterday, is pretty distressing. Evidently is is/was still hospitalized, but was intent upon killing himself right there in the hospital. I can only hope and pray that any and all attempts are/have been thwarted by hospital staff.

I've only commented on his blog once, but have been lurking for some time and been following his ordeal. Hopefully he hasn't succeeded in his in hospital suicide plan (not sure how closely monitored the patients are, if it's a psych facility I would hope pretty closely), and hopefully he is being protected from himself and will be until such a time as he is truly stable.
Gavin Bollard said…
Thanks for the update. My daily google alerts for aspergers picked it up and I'm glad that he's still alive and kicking.
Gavin Heaton said…
Great post and perspective! So glad you contributed to the book.

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